Science in the news

Welcome to the "science in the news" page, where you can find links to some of the amazing science breakthroughs that are happening every day!



  • Exposing vaccine hesitant to real-life pain of diseases makes them more pro-vaccine
    New research from Brigham Young University professors finds there is a better way to help increase support for vaccinations: Expose people to the pain and suffering caused by vaccine-preventable diseases instead of trying to combat people with vaccine facts.
  • A simple, yet versatile, new design for chaotic oscillating circuitry inspired by prime numbers
    Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have found a simple, yet highly versatile, way to generate 'chaotic signals' with various features. The technique consists of interconnecting three 'ring oscillators,' effectively making them compete against each other, while controlling their respective strengths and their linkages. The resulting device is rather small and efficient, thus suitable for emerging applications such as realizing wireless networks of sensors.
  • Long-lived roundworms help identify new anti-aging compounds among the FDA approved drugs
    Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases. They discovered that aging in nematodes is partially programmed and can be therapeutically reversed by a number of FDA-approved drugs.
  • The top 25 medical lab tests around the world
    A recent study can help governments understand which diagnostic laboratory tests are most important when developing universal health coverage systems.
  • A light matter: Understanding the Raman dance of solids
    Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Keio University investigated the excitation and detection of photogenerated coherent phonons in polar semiconductor GaAs through an ultrafast dual pump-probe laser for quantum interferometry.

Intel Young Scientists Awards 2014 

Nathan Han, 15, of Boston, Massachusetts, won the Gordon E. Moore Award for developing a machine learning software tool to study mutations of a gene linked to breast and ovarian cancer. Using data from publicly available databases, Han examined detailed characteristics of mutations of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene, vital in protecting cells from developing cancer, in order to “teach” his software to differentiate between mutations that cause disease and those that do not. His tool exhibits an 81 percent accuracy rate and could be used to more accurately identify cancer threats from BRCA1 gene mutations. Applications for Han’s research extend from identifying specific mutations that cause cancer and other diseases, to advancements in the fields of genomics, bioinformatics and big data. The Gordon E. Moore Award, named in honor of the Intel co-founder and retired chairman/CEO, includes USD 75,000 in scholarship funds.

2014 Intel ISEF Gordon E. Moore Award winner Nathan Han                                                 

Runners-up honors went to two individuals: Lennart Kleinwort, 15, of Wurzburg, Germany, developed a new mathematical tool for smartphones and tablets that brings capabilities to hand-held devices, previously available only with more sophisticated and expensive computing tools; and Shannon Lee, 17, of Singapore, developed a novel electrocatalyst that may significantly improve batteries of the future.

2014 Intel ISEF Young Scientist Award winner Shannon Lee                                                 

2014 Intel ISEF Young Scientist Award winner Lennart Kleinwort