Science in the news

Welcome to the "science in the news" page, where you can find links to some of the amazing science breakthroughs that are happening every day!

  • Interactive virtual reality enhances physicians' treatment planning of complex conditions
    Interactive virtual reality (VR) brings medical images to life on screen, showing interventional radiologists a patient's unique internal anatomy to help physicians effectively prepare and tailor their approach to complex treatments, such as splenic artery aneurysm repair, according to new research being presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting.
  • The Swiss army knife of smoke screens
    The military uses smoke grenades to provide cover for people and tanks on the move. But the smoke arms race is on. Increasingly, sensors can now go beyond the visible range into the infrared (IR) region of the spectrum. So, researchers report developing a new kind of smoke that obscures both visible and IR detection. The researchers will present their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.
  • Living sensor can potentially prevent environmental disasters from fuel spills
    By the time a Colonial Pipeline leak was detected last fall during a routine inspection, vapors from the quarter-million gallons of released gasoline were so strong they prevented pipeline repair for days. Now, scientists report technology that would alert pipeline managers about leaks much earlier, avoiding the environmental disasters and fuel distribution disruptions resulting from pipeline leaks. The researchers present their work today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.
  • Experts issue recommendations to improve testosterone prescribing practices
    New scientific evidence has strengthened the case for reserving testosterone therapy for well-documented cases of hypogonadism, a condition where the body does not produce enough testosterone, Endocrine Society experts concluded in an updated Clinical Practice Guideline released today.
  • Clinical medicine training prepares medical students to treat transgender patients
    Medical students who are specifically trained in clinical transgender medicine are better prepared to treat transgender patients, a new study from Boston University School of Medicine suggests. The study results will be presented in a poster Saturday, March 17, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.

Intel Young Scientists Awards 2014 

Nathan Han, 15, of Boston, Massachusetts, won the Gordon E. Moore Award for developing a machine learning software tool to study mutations of a gene linked to breast and ovarian cancer. Using data from publicly available databases, Han examined detailed characteristics of mutations of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene, vital in protecting cells from developing cancer, in order to “teach” his software to differentiate between mutations that cause disease and those that do not. His tool exhibits an 81 percent accuracy rate and could be used to more accurately identify cancer threats from BRCA1 gene mutations. Applications for Han’s research extend from identifying specific mutations that cause cancer and other diseases, to advancements in the fields of genomics, bioinformatics and big data. The Gordon E. Moore Award, named in honor of the Intel co-founder and retired chairman/CEO, includes USD 75,000 in scholarship funds.

2014 Intel ISEF Gordon E. Moore Award winner Nathan Han                                                 

Runners-up honors went to two individuals: Lennart Kleinwort, 15, of Wurzburg, Germany, developed a new mathematical tool for smartphones and tablets that brings capabilities to hand-held devices, previously available only with more sophisticated and expensive computing tools; and Shannon Lee, 17, of Singapore, developed a novel electrocatalyst that may significantly improve batteries of the future.

2014 Intel ISEF Young Scientist Award winner Shannon Lee                                                 

2014 Intel ISEF Young Scientist Award winner Lennart Kleinwort